Saturday, 16 September 2017

Marion mom invents Bigfoot attracting spray

MARION — The nation's endless search for proof of Bigfoot's existence may soon come to an end.
A North Carolina-based wife and mother has home brewed a spray that she says can attract any Bigfoot within a mile and a half.
Sold at $7 a bottle, the "environmentally friendly" Bigfoot Juice also doubles as a bug spray, said creator Allie Megan Webb, who runs Happy Body Care out of Marion. She created it sitting at her kitchen table.
"How do you know it works?" Webb asked, laughing. "That's a tough question. I guess I could ask how do you know it doesn't work?"
There is anecdotal proof her spray does, in fact, attract a Bigfoot.
Field tests have been done, she said, and they include a recent outing by the research group Bigfoot 911, in which a Bigfoot sighting was reported. It happened the first week of August, in the woods of McDowell County. The report made national news.
"I think that's enough to say it can attract a Bigfoot," says Webb. "To attract a Bigfoot, you need a smell that is woodsy enough to keep from scaring him off. But slightly different enough to make him curious, and come to investigate."
Market reaction to the spray, which is sold on the internet, has ranged from excitement to giggles. This includes a guy named Jeffrey Wilson of Hawaii, who wanted to know if she made a troll repellent.
Webb — who also created a dog deodorant called Stinky Dog Spray — understands people may doubt the product. She won't swear there is a Bigfoot herself.
"But I do believe there is something out there in the woods," she says. "I'm definitely not trying to make fun of people who believe. A lot of people are more serious about this (juice) than I thought. There are people around the world inclined to believe Bigfoot is real."
That includes her husband, Corey, a member of Bigfoot 911 since 2014. He was out the night of Aug. 4 when Bigfoot 911 reported spotting "a large bipedal animal covered in hair." Corey didn't see it himself, but he's a believer.
She gives him a lot of credit for Bigfoot Juice. He was using her home-concocted bug spray during Bigfoot hunts, and asked her to make something less "feminine smelling." She started whipping things together and found a more musky, outdoors smell. Next thing you know, the team spotted a Bigfoot.
Coincidental? Maybe. Opportune? Definitely.
Corey Webb guesses the secret of the juice is that it masks human odors, which could frighten a Bigfoot. "Honestly, I don't know if it's a key to finding Bigfoot, but it's definitely not going to hurt your chances," he says.
His advice if you attract a Bigfoot with the juice?
"Just stand there. I wouldn't run. There are no reports of a Bigfoot being aggressive."
His wife suggests something else, however. "Pull out your camera immediately."

Local Man Says He Found Bigfoot

BAY COUNTY, Fla. - Thought to be a legend or a myth at least one local man says Bigfoot has been said to be spotted in the Panhandle. Southport resident, Dustin Teudhope, says he first encountered the creature back in 2009.  
One day in 2009 turned a skeptic into a believer. Dustin Teudhope says was forever changed while hunting in the Apalachicola National Forest when he says he encountered a creature like no other. 
"It kind of made me a little unnerved and I tried to tell my friends about it and they just thought it was make believe and that I was seeing things. I really know what I saw so I just went on looking more for it and I just kept finding more and more," said Dustin Teudhope, Bigfoot Witness.
Teudhope says the animal looked like a cross between a gorilla and a bear... it was Bigfoot.  "They're pretty scary. They've got a muzzle and ears that will stand up or lay down, and on two feet it resembles a werewolf," said Teudhope. 
Since that first sighting, he is determined to prove what he saw to be true. He and his friends set up cameras throughout the forest, cameras said to have caught the sights, heaving breathing and growls of the creature. He even says that signs seen here in the panhandle, match the signs of other sightings across the nation. 
Along with video footage of what he believes to be Bigfoot, he has also found hand crafted weapons made from sticks and large footprints that they made a cast of for record. Teudhope says Bigfoot is real, and for those going into the woods, be prepared.
"It's serious, it's not a joking matter, it's not something that people are just making up. They're really out there," said Teudhope. 
Teudhope has also written a book that captures his first hand encounter and his journey tracking Bigfoot. He says he plans to write another book soon on his most recent findings.

COLUMBIA FALLS WOMAN TRACKS BIGFOOT FOR 24 YEARS

Misty Allabaugh knows exactly what she saw as she rested her head against the back door of her dad’s truck that late October day in 1993.
It was just before dusk as her family headed out of the woods west of Kalispell where they’d spent the day hunting.
“My mom gasped,” Allabaugh recalled. “And my dad said, ‘let it go, Mary.’”
Her father had worked backcountry logging jobs all his life, and had seen some odd occurrences through the years that couldn’t easily be explained. He’d been told if you leave “it” alone, it will leave you alone.
Then Allabaugh saw it with her own eyes. It was like nothing she’d ever seen before, but she knew it was Bigfoot. “There’s no doubt in my mind,” she said. “It was on a short hill. You could see the daylight between his arms, his hair lifting in the breeze.”
Her mother turned to her and asked: “Did you see the hairy man cross the road?”
Allabaugh, of Columbia Falls, was 17 when she witnessed the ape-like creature. The sighting left her wanting to know more, and the intrigue never left.
Now, 24 years later, Allabaugh’s research and relentless search for Bigfoot, synonymously known as Sasquatch, has turned into a career for her. She is the emcee for the upcoming Big Sky Bigfoot Conference planned in Hamilton Sept. 22-23.=read more

The Bigfoot files

When it boils down to it, Bigfoot (or the skunk ape, yeti, sasquatch, Hairy Yow, Yowie, Abominable Snowman, The Notorious B.I.G.F.O.O.T., Gigantopithecus or whatever name, depending on your region, you choose to call it) is really just misunderstood.
Think about it. He’s a rare beastie who lives in the woods, and all he probably wants to do is mind his own business. Is that too much to ask for a possible genetic offshoot of the ancient Neanderthal? So, what if he’s camera shy? When you have all that fur on ya, every day is a bad hair day.
In any case, Bigfoot is a cultural phenomenon, particularly in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Tourist traps with names like ‘The Oddity House’ or ‘The Mystery Shack’ purport to have hair, plaster =read more

Terry Cloth: Bigfoot lives in Ashtabula Harbor

The creature towers over visitors to Frank Clayman’s garage in the Ashtabula Harbor. 
A 10-foot-tall mythical ape-man, sculpted from foam insulation and covered with gorilla hair, is the latest work of the 56-year-old artist. 
“I’m capitalizing on the Bigfoot craze,” Clayman said. “It was an adventure just building it.”
When I first heard about the giant beast dwelling in Clayman’s garage, I thought, “Could there be another middle-aged man enchanted with a gorilla?”
Faithful readers will recall Hubby (without my knowledge) bought a life-size stuffed gorilla toy about three years ago.
He enjoyed scaring me with the gorilla, including the night he put the gorilla on the toilet, set up a wildlife camera, turned off the lights and waited for me to come home.=read more

Saturday, 9 September 2017

Weird Wednesdays: The Bigfoot files

When it boils down to it, Bigfoot (or the skunk ape, yeti, sasquatch, Hairy Yow, Yowie, Abominable Snowman, The Notorious B.I.G.F.O.O.T., Gigantopithecus or whatever name, depending on your region, you choose to call it) is really just misunderstood.
Think about it. He’s a rare beastie who lives in the woods, and all he probably wants to do is mind his own business. Is that too much to ask for a possible genetic offshoot of the ancient Neanderthal? So, what if he’s camera shy? When you have all that fur on ya, every day is a bad hair day.
In any case, Bigfoot is a cultural phenomenon, particularly in the Pacific Northwest of the United =read more

Guidebook offers tips for kids to explore nature in search of 'Bigfoot'

“A Young Researcher’s Guide to Bigfoot” is based on the two Hudson Valley women's experiences in the field. They offer information and tips to children who are interested in researching the existence of the elusive Bigfoot and a guide to exploring nature.
For many years, stories have been passed down from generation to generation about hairy, man-like creatures who roam forests around the world, according to a written release about the book. Tribes who came to respect these creatures’ territory had many names for these dwellers of the forest that include Bigfoot, Sasquatch and Mesingue.
“One of our team members did a docudrama about us and we gave him a Bigfoot necklace,” Beatty said in the release. “His four children had many questions and he was at a loss for words on how to explain it, which is why we felt it was important to write a book educating parents and children about Bigfoot.”
The authors share information about the creatures of the forest that "encourages curious young researchers to venture into the woods and carefully search for evidence that may prove these legendary creatures truly exist."
For more information, visit www.bigfootresearcher.com